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By NEW HOPE COSMETIC AND FAMILY DENTISTRY
November 12, 2021
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry

If you are tired of stained and discolored teeth, help is available from your local dentist. For teeth whitening in New Hope, PA, visit us at New Hope Cosmetic and Family Dentistry. Dr. Dawn Rickert will help restore the beauty of your smile.

What Causes Dental Stains?

Dental stains are commonly caused by coffee, tea, tobacco, or red wine. They can also be caused by certain medications or simply genetics. Some foods and beverages contain pigments that stick to the surface of your teeth. This means that even if you brush your teeth immediately after eating these foods and beverages, it's likely they'll still remain on your teeth.

Once stained, teeth can appear yellow or brownish in color. The shade of the discoloration depends on the individual as well as what they're consuming.

How Can Dental Teeth Whitening Help?

Dental teeth whitening is a cosmetic dentistry procedure that uses hydrogen peroxide gel to remove stains. It is a safe and effective procedure performed at our office in New Hope, PA. Teeth whitening results will be noticeable immediately and the process only takes about an hour. It will not cause damage to the enamel of your teeth and can be done on your lunch break.

As long as you care for your newly whitened teeth by practicing good dental hygiene and limiting or avoiding staining foods, the results will last longer. Your bright smile can last years.

If you want to whiten your teeth at home, we will provide you with a custom tray filled with whitening gel which you will place over your teeth for an hour at a time.

You do not have to live with yellow or brown teeth. Don't hesitate to make a trip to the office of Dr. Rickert. Our staff can provide fast and effective teeth whitening in New Hope, PA. Call us at (215) 862-2525 for your initial consultation today. We will help you show off a bright new smile in no time.

By NEW HOPE COSMETIC AND FAMILY DENTISTRY
October 15, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sleep apnea   teeth grinding   bruxism  

Discover more effective ways to get your nightly teeth grinding under control.

Has our New Hope, PA, dentist Dr. Dawn Rickert told you that you grind your teeth? You might not even realize you do it, especially if you are notorious for grinding your teeth (a condition known as bruxism) at night. Unfortunately, this nocturnal habit can cause some serious wear and tear, which can eventually lead to worn down, weak, and damaged teeth. To prevent these complications from happening to you, there are strategies to reduce nighttime teeth grinding and its negative effects.

Let’s First Determine the Cause

To figure out the best approaches to treating your nighttime teeth grinding we first need to figure out what is causing this nasty habit. Through imaging and an oral examination, we can often figure out if there is damage to a tooth, misaligned jaws, or jaw muscle tenderness that could result in teeth grinding. If you’ve been told that your bruxism is due to sleep problems, our New Hope, PA, dentist also focuses on treating sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and any teeth grinding that may result.

From There, We Can Treat Your Nighttime Grinding

Now that we know what’s going on, we are ready to help you get the relief you’ve been looking for. If we discover that your grinding may be due to misaligned jaws or teeth, we may recommend getting orthodontic treatment to correct this issue. Other treatment options include,

  • Medications such as Botox or muscle relaxants
  • Biofeedback to alter bad habits and to help you control your jaw muscles
  • Changes to current lifestyle and behaviors that could predispose you to teeth grinding
  • Stress management
  • A nighttime splint or custom mouthguard

Dr. Rickert and her team can craft custom-fitted splints to help prevent damage to teeth during nighttime clenching and grinding. While it won’t stop teeth grinding, wearing this device while you sleep can slow the progression of wear and tear on your teeth to prevent injury in the future.

If you are guilty of teeth grinding, know that our New Hope, PA, family dentist Dr. Rickert and the team at New Hope Cosmetic and Family Dentistry can provide you with a protective custom-fitted mouthguard and other strategies to prevent damage to your smile. To discuss getting a nightguard to stop bruxism, call us at (215) 862-2525

By New Hope Cosmetic and Family Dentistry
October 04, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  
SeeYourDentistFirstBeforeUsingaHomeTeethWhiteningKit

Are your stained teeth bumming you out? There's good news—you can transform that dull and dingy smile yourself with a tooth whitening product.

There are dozens of over-the-counter whitening kits that allow you to brighten your own smile. Although not as controlled and long-lasting as a dentist's professional whitening, these DIY kits can still give you effective results.

But since these products involve chemical solutions that bleach tooth enamel, there's a common concern about their safety. Could you be harming your teeth by using a home whitening kit?

The answer is no—as long as you follow the manufacturer's directions for using the product. These kits have been formulated with a lower percentage of bleaching agent (usually 10% carbamide peroxide) than whitening solutions used by dentists. They've also been subjected to several clinical studies gauging both their effectiveness and safety.

That said, though, exceeding a product's recommended directions and frequency of use could cause you problems. If not used properly, a bleaching solution can erode tooth enamel—and this protective tooth layer doesn't grow back! As long as you whiten "within the lines," so to speak, you shouldn't encounter this kind of situation.

With that said, though, there are good reasons to consult your dentist before using a whitening product, or have them perform the whitening for you.

For one thing, an over-the-counter whitening product won't work if the staining originates from inside a tooth. It's wise, then, to have a dental examination first before using a whitening product to uncover this or any other underlying dental problems that should be addressed first.

You may also find a professional whitening will give you a more desirable result. A stronger professional bleaching solution under a dentist's expert control can produce a brighter, longer lasting smile than a home use product. A dentist may also be able to control the level of brightness better to help you achieve the smile effect you desire, from subtle white to ultra-bright.

Whichever way you go, your dentist can advise you on your options and make sure your teeth are in good shape for whitening. The end result can be a brighter smile—and a brighter mood.

If you would like more information on teeth whitening, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Whitening Safety Tips.”

By New Hope Cosmetic and Family Dentistry
September 24, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: loose tooth  
YouNeedtoActFasttoSaveaLooseTooth

Some things in life are almost guaranteed to make you go, "Uh, oh"—your car won't start, your a/c goes out, or, worse yet, you get an unexpected letter from the IRS.

Here's another: One of your teeth is loose. And, if you don't act quickly, that loose tooth may soon become a lost tooth.

But first, we need to find out why it's loose. It's usually due to one of two types of injury related to your bite. One type is called primary occlusal trauma. This results from your teeth encountering higher than normal biting forces. This often happens if you habitually gnash or grind your teeth together outside of normal functions like eating or speaking.

The other type is secondary occlusal trauma. In this case, the supporting gum tissues and bone have been weakened or lost by disease, with the gum tissues possibly becoming detached. Without this support, even normal biting forces could loosen a tooth.

Our treatment approach for a loose tooth may differ depending on which of these is the cause. For primary occlusal trauma, we want to reduce the biting forces that have contributed to loosening the tooth. One way to do this is to create a mouthguard that when worn prevents teeth from making solid contact during grinding episodes.

For secondary trauma, we want to first focus on treating any gum disease responsible for weakening the gum tissues. Once we have it under control, the gums and bone tissues can heal and possibly regain and strengthen their attachment with the tooth.

At the same time, we may also need to stabilize a loose tooth to prevent its loss. This usually involves splinting, whereby we use neighboring healthy teeth to support the loose tooth. One way to do this is to attach a metal strip across the backs of the loose tooth and its more stable neighbors, or by way of a channel cut through the top biting surfaces of the teeth.

If a loose tooth regains its attachment with the gums and bone, it may stabilize and any splinting can be removed. If not, splinting may become a permanent solution. Either way, prompt treatment can help us save your loose tooth.

If you would like more information on treating loose teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Loose Teeth: Biting Forces Can Loosen Teeth.”

By New Hope Cosmetic and Family Dentistry
September 14, 2021
Category: Oral Health
VictoriaBeckhamsToothsomeCollection-AllofHerChildrensBabyTeeth

In one respect, celebrities are no different from the rest of us—quite a few famous people love to collect things. Marie Osmond collects dolls (as well as Johnny Depp, reportedly); Leonardo DiCaprio, vintage toys. And, of course, Jay Leno has his famous fleet of cars. But Victoria Beckham's collection is unusually "familial"—she's kept all of her four children's "baby" teeth after they've fallen out.

Best known as Posh Spice of the 1990s group Spice Girls and now a fashion designer and TV personality, Beckham told People Magazine that she has an "entire bucket" of her kids' primary teeth. And, she recently added to it when her nine-year old daughter lost another tooth earlier this year.

You may or may not want to keep your child's baby teeth, but you'll certainly have the opportunity. Children start losing their first set of teeth around age 6 or 7 through early puberty. During the process, each tooth's roots and gum attachment weakens to the point that the tooth becomes noticeably loose. Not long after, it gives way and falls out.

Although a baby tooth doesn't normally need any help with this, children (and sometimes parents) are often eager to accelerate the process. A loose tooth can be annoying—plus there's often a financial incentive via the "Tooth Fairy!"

First off, there's not much harm in a child wiggling a loose tooth—it may even help it come out. It's also possible to help the tooth safely detach sooner by taking a small piece of tissue, folding it over the tooth and giving it a gentle downward squeeze. If it's loose enough, it should pop out.

If it doesn't, don't resort to more forcible measures like the proverbial string and a door—just wait a day or two before trying the gentle squeeze method again. Once the tooth comes out, the empty socket may bleed a bit or not at all. If heavy bleeding does occur, have the child bite down on a piece of clean gauze or a wet tea bag until it stops. You may also have them eat softer foods for a few days to avoid a resumption of bleeding.

Beyond that, there's little else to do but place it under your child's pillow for the Tooth Fairy. And if after their "exchange" with that famous member of the Fae Folk you find yourself in possession of the erstwhile tooth, consider taking a cue from Victoria Beckham and add it to your own collection of family memories.

If you would like more information about losing baby teeth, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Importance of Baby Teeth.”





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